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Countdown to JPSS-1 Launch

The Joint Polar Satellite System-1, the first in a new series of highly advanced NOAA polar-orbiting satellites, is scheduled to lift off Nov. 10, at 1:47 a.m. PST from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

“The new JPSS satellite will join GOES-16 as we are confronting one of the most tragic hurricane seasons in the past decade,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The JPSS satellite system will provide advanced forecasting on not only hurricanes, but also dangerous weather events threatening communities across the United States.”

The satellite, called JPSS-1, will provide meteorologists with a variety of observations, such as atmospheric temperature and moisture, sea-surface temperature, ocean color, sea ice cover, volcanic ash and fire detection. Forecasters will be able to use the data to better predict weather events and hazards, such as a hurricane’s track, and when a hurricane will intensify or weaken, as well as identifying power outages in addition to locating and evaluating damage following a storm.

Circling the globe 14 times a day

JPSS-1, which will be known as NOAA-20 when it reaches polar orbit, will join the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP), a joint NOAA-NASA weather satellite, giving the U.S. the benefit of two, sophisticated polar satellites in the same orbit. Each will circle the globe 14 times a day, 50 minutes apart and provide full, global observations for U.S. weather prediction. After it successfully clears the on-orbit test phase, NOAA-20 will become the nation’s primary polar weather satellite and Suomi NPP will become its back up.

“Having two advanced polar satellites in the same orbit will ensure our numerical weather models have the necessary, critical data to support forecasts up to seven days ahead of extreme weather events,” said Stephen Volz, Ph.D., director of NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service.

“Eighty-five percent of the data flowing into our weather forecast models come from polar-orbiting satellites, such as Suomi NPP and the new JPSS series,“ said Louis W. Uccellini, Ph.D., director of NOAA’s National Weather Service. “Using polar satellite data, we have been able to provide emergency managers with more accurate forecasts, allowing them to pre-position equipment and resources days before a storm. JPSS will continue this trend.”

Major Upgrade

The five next-generation instruments on JPSS will be a major upgrade from NOAA’s legacy polar-orbiting satellites. JPSS will provide more detailed information about atmospheric temperature and air moisture leading to more accurate near-term weather predictions. Over longer timescales, this data will help improve our understanding of climate patterns that influence the weather, such as El Nino and La Nina.

The JPSS program is a partnership between NOAA and NASA that will oversee all the satellites in the series. NOAA funds and manages the program, operations and data products. NASA develops and builds the instruments, spacecraft and ground system and launches the satellites for NOAA.

“The launch of JPSS-1 continues the strong, decades-long partnership between NOAA and NASA in developing state-of-the-art Earth observation satellites,” said Sandra Smalley, director of NASA’s Joint Agency Satellite Division. “We are proud to contribute to NOAA’s continued leadership in critical weather forecasting throughout the entire JPSS series.”

Ball Aerospace designed and built the JPSS-1 satellite bus, and Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite instrument, integrated all five of the spacecraft’s instruments and performed satellite-level testing and launch support. Raytheon Corporation built the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite and the Common Ground System. Harris Corporation built the Cross-track Infrared Sounder. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems built the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder and the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System instrument.

NASA-TV will cover the launch live and can be viewed at www.nasa.gov/ntv, starting at 1:15 a.m. PST on November 10.

Credit: NOAA, https://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/content/jpss-1-press

JeTSI on M2 Strategy NESDIS Team

JeTSI is pleased to be part of M2 Strategy‘s NOAA NESDIS Team along with INNOVIM and Bryce Space & Technology. M2 Strategy was awarded a three-year contract with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to provide Strategic Planning, Enterprise Architecture, Human Capital and Program/Portfolio Management consulting services to the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) on August 3, 2017.

To read more about the Contract, please visit M2 Strategy’s release: http://www.m2strategy.com/m2-strategy-awarded-a-3-year-contract-with-nesdis/

 

JeTSI at NOAA 2017 Satellite Conference

JeTSI presented “Open R2O Architecture – Reducing the Cost of Entry for Science Applications,” by Dr. Stephen Marley and Patrick Barnes at  NOAA’s 2017 Satellite Conference. The poster demonstrates a new approach to the Research-to-Operations (R2O) algorithm life cycle that leverages commodity cloud services, agile algorithm development, and open access to NOAA observational assets. Built around rigorous algorithm architecture models, an open algorithm development API and a scalable algorithm execution architecture, the “Open R2O Architecture” significantly reduces the cost of entry to perform basic research, provides high-throughput product generation services, and provides value-added end-user services.

 

JeTSI to Participate in NOAA’s 2017 Satellite Conference

JeTSI will be presenting a poster at NOAA’s 2017 Satellite Conference at the City College of New York, July 17 – 20. The poster will demonstrate a new approach to the Research-to-Operations (R2O) algorithm life cycle that leverages commodity cloud services, agile algorithm development, and open access to NOAA observational assets. Built around rigorous algorithm architecture models, an open algorithm development API and a scalable algorithm execution architecture, the “Open R2O Architecture” significantly reduces the cost of entry to perform basic research, provides high-throughput product generation services, and provides value-added end-user services.

The poster, “Open R2O Architecture – Reducing the Cost of Entry for Science Applications,” by Dr. Stephen Marley and Patrick Barnes, JeTSI, will be viewable on our website after the conference.

JeTSI on INNOVIM Small Business Team

JeTSI is pleased to announce that we are on the small business INNOVIM Team selected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for a Professional and Technical (ProTech) Satellite Domain contract award as part of a suite of multiple Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts.

JeTSI is looking forward to working with the INNOVIM team and NOAA in providing systems engineering and architecture services to manage the Nation’s operational and environmental satellites of today and in the future. These satellites are used to forecast weather, analyze the environment and climate phenomena, and monitor hazardous conditions as well as provide proactive response and environmental intelligence. INNOVIM ProTech Team SOW Areas are listed in the team resource brochure.

Review the INNOVIM ProTech Team brochure to see how we can help meet your needs.

JeTSI Innovim Team ProTech Announcement

 

JeTSI at NoMagic World Symposium

JeTSI Modelers attended the NoMagic World Symposium.

JeTSI has been on the forefront of applying Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) services and products utilizing the Department of Defense Architectural Framework (DoDAF) on large aerospace projects.  We have been working with NASA and NOAA on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Ground Project (GP) since 2010. The JPSS GP spans the globe, with two Ground Terminal sites on each pole, plus communications provided by NASA’s Space Network geosynchronous communications satellites. The JPSS GP has numerous interfaces to other weather programs, NASA support organizations, other NOAA entities, other civil agencies and elements of the Department of Defense.

Leveraging UPDM, JeTSI worked with NASA to develop a very complete and detailed model of the JPSS GP. This architecture allowed NASA to execute its technical management activities with minimal resources, and to communicate the systems concepts and nuances throughout the life cycle. The full benefit of this work will be realized when the JPSS-2, JPSS-3, and JPSS-4 satellites are deployed over the next decade without having to re-develop the technical baseline for each new deployment.

JeTSI also leveraged the JPSS GP architecture to assist NOAA’s Office of Satellite Ground Services (OSGS) in charting the overall NESDSIS ground system architecture into the next decade. For both NASA and NOAA, JeTSI has been in a unique position to support major system trades (capability, cost, and schedule) as NOAA charts its new course into the future of weather satellites.

Rip Current Survival Guide

As you start heading out to the beaches, be sure you know how to identify and survive a rip current!

Rip currents are channelized currents of water flowing away from shore at surf beaches. Typically, they form at breaks in sandbars, and also near structures, such as jetties and piers, as well as cliffs that jut into the water. Rip currents are common and can be found on most surf beaches, including the Great Lakes and Gulf of Mexico.

How to Survive a Rip Current:

  • Don’t fight the current. It’s a natural treadmill that travels an average speed of 1-2 feet per second, but has been measured as fast as 8 feet per second—faster than an Olympic swimmer.
  • Relax and float to conserve energy. Staying calm may save your life.
  • Do NOT try to swim directly into to shore. Swim along the shoreline until you escape the current’s pull. When free from the pull of the current, swim at an angle away from the current toward shore.
  • If you feel you can’t reach shore, relax, face the shore, and call or wave for help. Remember: If in doubt, don’t go out!

 

Credit: National Weather Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administaration

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Space Exploration Essay Contest

August Update – Bethany is having fun at AstroCamp!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are excited to announce the winner of the JeTSI Space Exploration Essay Contest – Bethany Hinshaw!! Bethany, who attends Thomas Harrison Middle School in Harrisonburg, Virginia, has won a week at AstroCamp in Clover, Virginia.

Read Bethany’s winning essay describing what she would bring on a journey to the International Space Station.

Way to go Bethany!!

Astrocamp

AMS 2017 Presentation Slides

JeTSI team member Laura Ellen Dafoe presented  “Characterization of the Data Volume Generated by the S-NPP Mission to Support Decisions Regarding Data Downlink Resource Management” during the 2017 American Meteorological Society’s 13th Annual Symposium on New Generation Operational Environmental Satellite Systems in Seattle, WA in January.

Additionally, team members, Dr. Stephen Marley and Laura Ellen Dafoe, were co-authors along with Alexander Werbos (AER) and T.S. Zaccheo on “A Collaborative Approach for Algorithm Operationalization”during the 7th Conference on Transition of Research to Operations.

Click the links above to view the presentation slides. The recorded presentations will be available in late February through the AMS 2017 website.

JeTSI at AMS 2017

We are pleased to announce that JeTSI team member, Laura Ellen Dafoe, has been selected to provide a presentation at the American Meteorological Society’s 13th Annual Symposium on New Generation Operational Environmental Satellite Systems to be held in Seattle, Washington January 22-26, 2017. Laura Ellen Dafoe will present “Characterization of the Data Volume Generated by the S-NPP Mission to Support Decisions Regarding Data Downlink Resource Management” on Thursday, January 25.

The presentation will take a look at the volume and rate of the data from the six S-NPP data sources analyzed and characterized for the time period April 2012 through December 2015. This characterization supports S-NPP and JPSS Program decisions on satellite data downlink resource management as well as concepts of operations and requirements for future missions. Understanding the variability of the data generation supports optimal and low risk operational decisions on data downlink operations.

Additionally, team members, Dr. Stephen Marley and Laura Ellen Dafoe, are co-authors along with Alexander Werbos (AER) and T.S. Zaccheo on “A Collaborative Approach for Algorithm Operationalization” being presented on Tuesday, January 24.